Advanced Spanish and Argentine Culture Advanced Language and Culture in Buenos Aires Program Course

Advanced Spanish and Argentine Culture Advanced Language and Culture in Buenos Aires Program Course Advanced Spanish and Argentine Culture is design

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Advanced Spanish and Argentine Culture

Advanced Language and Culture in Buenos Aires Program Course

Advanced Spanish and Argentine Culture is designed especially for participants on the Summer Language and Culture program. It is taught in Spanish by Argentine professors. This course is worth 3 U.S. semester credit hours and is required for all program participants. Course Description: The aim of the course is to enable students to practice the four macro-skills: listening, speaking, writing and reading making the most of the Spanish-speaking environment in which the course is offered and encouraging students to come into contact with different aspects of the Argentine cultural, social and political reality while fostering their interaction with native speakers. The course begins with an evaluation designed to assess the student’s linguistic competency. This evaluation comprises: • an oral interview in Spanish to assess the student’s oral expression and comprehension through the organization of discourse and the handling of syntactic structures, vocabulary, fluency and diction; • a Spanish language test to assess the student’s written expression and reading and comprehension skills through the handling of syntactic structures and vocabulary and the student’s competency regarding the specific features of the written register. The course comprises 48 contact hours distributed as follows: 2 Spanish language workshop hours during the orientation period; 36 class hours throughout the duration of the course and 8 mandatory hours for assignments involving cultural outings and visits (a visit to the old part of the city, a visit to a tango club, a guided visit to the Malba Museum of Latin American Art, a visit to the artisan and folk craft fair in the neighborhood of Mataderos, etc.). General Course Objectives: The overall objective pursued by the Advanced Spanish Language and Argentine Culture Course is to offer students the tools required to enable them to improve their Spanish through a varied approach based on their fields of interest. The course is designed as a space for the discussion and revision of basic language structures and for the presentation, acquisition and practice of more complex discursive strategies through an in-depth approach to cultural topics. The course will address the discussion of topics regarding Argentine culture through reading assignments, discussion and written papers. Specific Course Objectives: The course comprises three main components: 1) discussion and practice of grammar points; 2) reading, discussion and writing based on different types of texts; Institute for Study Abroad® • 1100 W. 42nd St., Suite 305 • Indianapolis, IN 46208 • 800-858-0229 • Fax: 317-940-9704 • www.ifsa-butler.org

3) reflection on and discussion of cultural topics. The specific objectives of these three core components are to enable students to: • • • •

Explore different strategies for the comprehension and analysis of complex texts and genres of discourse specific to the academic field. Incorporate critical reflection on oral and written communication processes thus enabling them to come into contact with the social cultural production. Master the tools required for the appropriate and effective production of expositive and argumentative texts in Spanish. Improve their text production processes, reading comprehension and oral expression in Spanish by developing different linguistic strategies.

Thematic Content: • Introduction to Argentine culture. Everyday life, groups of belonging, local customs and habits. Cultural differences. • The City of Buenos Aires: neighborhoods, means of transport, communications, public spaces. • The manner of speaking in Buenos Aires. Presentation and analysis of its specific features. Local vocabulary. The lunfardo. • Presentation and discussion of topics associated with Argentina at present through the reading and analysis of the main Buenos Aires dailies. • Iconic personalities of Argentine culture (Eva Perón, “Che” Guevara, Jorge Luis Borges, Victoria Ocampo, etc.). • Museums: presentation in class and guided visits to different museums in the city. Opera: the Colón Theater and the place occupied by opera amongst the people of the City of Buenos Aires. • Theater, movies and soccer in the lives of the Argentine people. • Tango, River Plate music. Different stages and styles. The themes of tango lyrics. Tango as a dance. Visit to a milonga (tango club). • Argentine humor in the graphic media and television. The politically (in)correct in Argentina. • Contemporary Argentine music (“national rock or Argentine rock”), its main interpreters. • The relationship between the city and the farmlands. Urban culture vs. rural culture. Visit to an estancia (crop and livestock producing farm) and to folk art fairs. Course Grammar Content • Verb To Be. Different verbs to express "To Be" in Spanish, according to the context (“ser” vs. “estar”). Distinctive features of the River Plate Spanish. Morphologic features of the use of the “vos” form instead of “tú”. • The pronominal system. Direct and indirect object pronouns. The duplication of the indirect object. Degrees of transitivity. Comparison with the use of pronouns in Spain; leísmo, the use of “le” instead of “lo” and “la”. • Verbal aspect: the contrast between the pretérito imperfecto and the pretérito indefinido. Adverbs and adverbial phrases related with the verbal aspect. • The subjunctive mode. Mandatory and optional uses. Temporal correlation with verbs requiring the use of the subjunctive in the past tense. • Type 1, 2, 3 and mixed conditional sentences. Uses and value. • Reported speech with introductory verbs in the present and past tense. Adverbial and pronominal reference in reported speech.

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• • • •

Value of some prepositions in Spanish. Prepositions in fixed expressions. Personal direct objects. Prepositional verbs and verbs with prepositions. Contrast between cause and effect. Different functions of “por” and “para”. Passive voice structures. Grammatical resources to express impersonality. Relative pronouns. Logical and discursive connectors.

Course Assessment: The overall assessment of the Advanced Spanish Language and Argentine Culture Course takes into account the level of commitment and personal progress achieved by each student as against the general and specific objectives of the course syllabus. Special attention is given to the following components: • • • • • •

Individual and progressive development of language competencies. Participation in class discussions. Timely compliance with course requirements. Compliance with the assignments given by the professor. Dedication in the approach to and analysis of the topics submitted to discussion. Attendance and punctuality.

Formal Assessment: The course assessment is twofold: • Mid-term oral group presentation: At the beginning of the third week of classes, students are required to make an oral presentation on the product of a Photographic Report of the City of Buenos Aires. The presentation is to be made in groups comprising 2 or 3 students and shall not extend beyond 20 minutes. • Final written essay and oral report: The last day of classes, each student is required to submit a final essay that must follow the guidelines (topic, format, style, etc.) set out by the professors at the beginning of the course. The essay shall be four pages long, double space. Considerations regarding the final essay: The final essay is individual work. The work consists in writing an article to be published in the newspaper produced by the student’s University in the US. The final written assignment involves the writing of an essay dealing with one of Argentina’s cultural aspects included in the syllabus and discussed in the Spanish Language course and in class (tango, soccer, humor, art, popular music, folklore, etc.) or a topic that has been previously approved by your professor. The essay must justify the choice of the topic and develop it and must also include quotations from the pertinent bibliography. The objective of this written work is to ensure that the student makes an in-depth analysis of a specific topic associated with his/her experience in Argentina. The essay shall be comprised of the following segments: title, descriptions and explanations, arguments, conclusions and bibliography: students should make use of at least three different bibliographical sources in the writing of their essay.

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Considerations regarding the final oral presentation: On the last day of classes, each student shall make a brief oral presentation before the group on his/her written essay. Each presentation shall not extend beyond five minutes per student. BIBLIOGRAPHY -AGUINIS, Marcos, El atroz encanto de ser argentinos, Planeta, 2001. -ALABARCES, Pablo, Fútbol y patria: el fútbol y las narrativas de la nación en la Argentina, Prometeo, 2003. -ALABARCES, Pablo, Entre gatos y violadores. El rock nacional en la cultura argentina, Buenos Aires, Colihue, 1993. -ARCHETTI, Eduardo P, Estilo y virtudes masculinas in El Gráfico: la creación del imaginario del fútbol argentino, Desarrollo económico, vol 35, No. 139, 1995. -BORGES, Jorge Luis, El idioma de los argentinos, Colecciones Índice, Buenos Aires, 1928 -Eternautas, Buenos Aires tiene historia, once itinerarios guiados por la ciudad. -FERNÁNDEZ BITAR, Marcelo, Historia del rock en Argentina, Buenos Aires, Distal, 1997. -FRYDENBERG, Julio D, Redefinición del fútbol aficionado y del fútbol oficial, Buenos Aires, 1912. -FRYDENBERG, Julio D, Prácticas y valores en el proceso de popularización del fútbol, Buenos Aires 19001910. -GRABIA, Gustavo, La doce, la verdadera historia de la barra brava de Boca, Sudamericana, 2009. -GUERRERO, Gloria, Indio Solari: el hombre ilustrado, Buenos Aires, Sudamericana, 2005. -KREIMER, Juan Carlos (compilador) Agarrate. Testimonios de la música joven de Argentina, Buenos Aires, Galerna, 1970. -LERNOUD, Pipo (director) Rock nacional, 30 años. Enciclopedia, Buenos Aires, Mordisco 1996. -LÓPEZ ANAYA, Jorge, Arte argentino, cuatro siglos de historia1600-2001, Emecé, 2001. -Museo Malba, Guía colección Malba. -PETRINA, Alberto (director), Buenos Aires. Guía de arquitectura. Ocho recorridos por la ciudad, Sevilla, 1998. -PUJOL, Sergio, Las ideas del rock. Genealogía de la música rebelde, Rosario, Homo Sapiens, 2007. -QUINO, Todo Mafalda. -QUINO, Esto no es todo. -SÁBATO, Ernesto, Tango, discusión y clave, Losada, 1997. -SALAS, Horacio, El tango. Una guía definitiva, Buenos Aires, Aguilar, 1996. -SALAS, Horacio, El tango, Planeta, 1995. -SARLO, Beatriz, Tiempo presente, Siglo Veintiuno editores, 2007. -SARLO, Beatriz, La ciudad vista, Siglo Veintiuno Editores, 2009. -SCHER, Ariel, Fútbol: pasión de multitudes y elites, Cisea, 1988. Institute for Study Abroad® • 1100 W. 42nd St., Suite 305 • Indianapolis, IN 46208 • 800-858-0229 • Fax: 317-940-9704 • www.ifsa-butler.org

-SEOANE, María, Nosotros, Sudamericana, 2005. -VILA,Pablo, Rock nacional, crónicas de la resistencia juvenil, in Jelin, Elizabeth (compiler), Los nuevos movimientos sociales, Buenos Aires, Ceal, 1985.

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Optional Program Course: Argentine History

Advanced Language and Culture in Buenos Aires Argentine History is designed especially for participants on the Summer Language and Culture program. It is taught in Spanish by Argentine professors. This course is worth 3 U.S. semester credit hours. Course Description: The course is aimed at addressing the main problem areas of Argentine history. The following topics will be analyzed, amongst others: the origins of Argentina, the difficulties encountered in the effort to organize the National State, the agro-export model, the Conservative regime, 1880-1916, the period of Radical Party administrations, the crisis of the thirties, the process of industrialization based on the substitution of imports, the rise of Peronism, the populist political and economic regime, the cycle of social and political instability between 1955 and 1983 (with the alternation of civilian and military governments), the military dictatorships, the return of democracy in 1983 and the crisis that broke out at the beginning of the new century. Course Objectives: To introduce the students to the analysis and discussion of the main political, economic, social and cultural processes that have marked Argentine history from its beginnings up to the present. The aim is to assist students in achieving a critical knowledge of the basic readings dealing with the topics under discussion. At the end of the course, students will be expected to understand the determining factors of the conflict underlying the construction of democracy in Argentina. Course Content: Unit 1: From the origins of the National State to the rise of Peronism Introduction to the major issues of Argentine history. An overview of Argentina during the 19th century. The consolidation of the National State and the agro-export model. Features of the oligarchic political regime. The Conservative administrations. Challenges faced by the regime: the Radical Civic Union and the Socialist Party. The workers’ movement and anarchism. The Sáenz Peña Law and the triumph of the Radicals in 1916. The radical administrations and the prominent role played by the middle sectors. The economy during the Radical period. The 1929-1930 crisis as a structural crisis of the agro-export model. The military coup led by Uriburu. The reorganization of the oligarchic regime and the so-called patriotic fraud. The Roca-Runciman Agreement. Industrialization based on the substitution of imports. The new role played by the State. Internal migrations and urbanization. The workers’ movement, trade unionism and the left in the Pre-Peronist period. The 1943 coup and the rise of Perón. Bibliography • •

Teresa Eggers-Brass: Historia Argentina 1806-2004. Una mirada crítica. Buenos Aires, Editorial Maipue, 2004. Chapters 8, 9 and 10. Sources and Activities Booklet.

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Unit 2: The Peronist Period, 1945-1955 October 17 and the rise of Perón to power. The two Peronist administrations. The relationship with the workers’ movement, the Armed Forces, business corporations and the Church. The new functions of the State. Economic and social policy. Different directions during the period: from the expansion of distributism to stabilization in 1952. The characteristics of Peronist populism. Bibliography • •

Teresa Eggers-Brass: Historia Argentina 1806-2004. Una mirada crítica. Buenos Aires, Editorial Maipue, 2004. Chapter 11. Sources and Activities Booklet.

Unit 3: A cycle of social and political instability, 1955-1976 The 1955 coup: the “Revolución Libertadora” (Liberating Revolution). The banning of Peronism and the Resistance. The administration of Frondizi. The “Desarrollista” (Developmental) Project. The Armed Forces during the 1958-1962 period. The “Azules” (Blues) and “Colorados” (Reds). The administration of Illia. Economic reorientation and labor policy. The 1966 coup. Onganía and the BureaucraticAuthoritarian State. The Doctrine of National Security. Popular reactions: the “Cordobazo”. The rise of urban guerrilla groups. Armed organizations: Montoneros and PRT-ERP. Lanusse and the “Gran Acuerdo Nacional” - GAN (Great National Agreement). The political parties and the “Hora de los Pueblos” (Hour of the People). The administrations of Cámpora, Perón and Isabel. The first steps of state terrorism: the Triple A and the “Independence” Operation. Bibliography • •

Teresa Eggers-Brass: Historia Argentina 1806-2004. Una mirada crítica. Buenos Aires, Editorial Maipue, 2004. Chapters 12 and 13. Sources and Activities Booklet.

Unit 4: The National Reorganization Process, 1976-1983 The 1976 coup: the “National Reorganization Process”. The systematic use of State Terrorism. Economic and social transformations. The social and political players: the Catholic Church, political parties and economic organizations. Opposition and resistance to the dictatorship. Human Rights organizations. The Mothers of Plaza de Mayo. The Malvinas (Falkland Islands) War: a flight forwards? Defeat and political withdrawal of the Armed Forces. Bibliography • •

Dussel, Inés; Finocchio, Silvia; Gojman, Silvia: Haciendo memoria en el país del Nunca Más. Buenos Aires, Eudeba, 1997. Chapter 1. Sources and Activities Booklet.

Unit 5: Democracy, from imposition to the crisis of Neoliberalism. 1983-2005 The return of democracy. The 1983 elections. The administration of Alfonsín. The trial of the military juntas. Economic, social and human rights policy. The 1989-1991 crisis. The two administrations of Menem. The Neoliberal reform and its consequences: the destruction of the State, privatizations, deregulation, social polarization. Corruption as a practice. Rise and failure of the “Alianza” (Alliance): the

Institute for Study Abroad® • 1100 W. 42nd St., Suite 305 • Indianapolis, IN 46208 • 800-858-0229 • Fax: 317-940-9704 • www.ifsa-butler.org

administration of De la Rúa. The 2001 crisis and its outcome. The return of the PJ (Justicialist Party) to power: Rodríguez Saá, Duhalde and Kirchner. A historic perspective of the current crisis. Bibliography Teresa Eggers-Brass: Historia Argentina 1806-2004. Una mirada crítica. Buenos Aires, Editorial Maipue, 2004. Chapters 15 and 16. Sources and Activities Booklet. Reference Bibliography • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Aspiazu, Daniel; Basualdo, Eduardo; Khavisse, Miguel: El nuevo poder económico en la Argentina de los años ´80. Buenos Aires, Hyspamérica, 1988. Azpiazu, Daniel and others: El proceso de privatización en la Argentina. La renegociación con las empresas privadas. Buenos Aires, Editorial La Página, 2002. Balvé, Beba et. al.: Lucha de calles, lucha de clases. Elementos para su análisis: Córdoba 1971-1969. Buenos Aires, Ediciones La Rosa Blindada, 1973. Botana, Natalio: El orden conservador. La política argentina entre 1880 y 1916. Buenos Aires, Hyspamérica, 1985. Brennan, James: El Cordobazo. Las guerras obreras en Córdoba 1955 - 1976. Buenos Aires, Sudamericana, 1996. Del Campo, Hugo: Sindicalismo y peronismo. Buenos Aires, CLACSO, 1983. Duhalde, Eduardo Luis: El Estado terrorista argentino. Buenos Aires, Eudeba 2000. Gillespie, Richard: Soldados de Perón. Los Montoneros. Grijalbo, 1987. James, Daniel: Resistencia e integración. Buenos Aires, Sudamericana, 1990. James, Daniel: Violencia, proscripción y autoritarismo (1955 – 1976). Nueva Historia Argentina Vol. 9. Buenos Aires, Sudamericana. Matsushita, Hiroshi: El movimiento obrero argentino, 1930 – 1945. Buenos Aires, Hyspamérica, 1986. Murmis, Miguel y Portantiero, Juan Carlos: Estudios sobre los orígenes el peronismo. Buenos Aires, Siglo XXI, 1987. Pozzi, Pablo andSchneider, Alejandro: Los setentistas. Izquierda y clase obrera 1969- 1976, Buenos Aires, EUDEBA, 2000. Rapoport, Mario: Historia económica, política y social de la Argentina (1880-2003). Buenos Aires. Emecé. 2007. Rock, David: El radicalismo argentino, 1890-1930. Buenos Aires, Amorrortu, 1975. Romero, Luis Alberto: Breve historia contemporánea de Argentina. Buenos Aires, Fondo de Cultura Económica, 1994. Rouquié, Alain: Poder militar y sociedad política en Argentina. Buenos Aires, Hyspamérica, 1986. Schvarzer, Jorge: La política económica de Martínez de Hoz. Buenos Aires, Hyspamérica, 1986. Suriano, Juan: Dictadura y democracia (1976 – 2001). Nueva Historia Argentina Vol. 10. Buenos Aires, Sudamericana, 2005. Torre, Juan Carlos: Los años peronistas. Nueva Historia Argentina. Vol. 8. Buenos Aires, Sudamericana, 2002.

Methodology: The professor will offer an overview of the different topics highlighting the central aspects of each historical period.

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The following are some of the activities that will be carried out during the classes: • • • • • • •

Oral discussion of the main course topics. Analysis of the reading material. Reading and analysis of different types of sources (official documents, maps, oral personal accounts, photographs, advertisements, literary texts, statistical charts, cartoon stories, newspaper articles, etc.) Analysis and defense of arguments. Completion of practical assignments. Power Point presentations summing up and exemplifying the course contents through audiovisual material. Analysis of documentary videos.

Assessment: Requirements to pass the course: • • • •

Attendance. Submission and passing of two (2) reading guides supplied by the professors during the course. Passing the oral presentation scheduled for the third week of classes. Passing the essay on a topic of recent Argentine history after 1976. The final essay is individual work and must be handed in during the last week of classes.

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Optional Program Course: Argentine and Latin American Literature

Advanced Language and Culture in Buenos Aires

Argentine and Latin American Literature is designed especially for participants on the Summer Language and Culture program. It is taught in Spanish by Argentine professors. This course is worth 3 U.S. semester credit hours. Course Objectives: • Offer students an introduction to Argentine and Latin American literature through the works of some of its most outstanding writers. • Provide students with the key tools for literary analysis that will assist them in addressing the texts with a critical approach. • Foster discussion and the generation of critical hypotheses regarding the texts under consideration. Course Content: Unit 1: Latin American Spaces The invention of Latin America: imaginary spaces and real spaces. The countryside, the desert and the city. The State, institutions and territory in the construction of the national identity. Travel accounts and the viewpoint of a foreigner: stereotypes, parody and ideological criticism. Readings • • • • • •

BORGES, Jorge Luis. “El sur”, in Ficciones. Buenos Aires: Sur, 1944. FONTANARROSA, Roberto. “Una historia de tango”, in Nada del otro mundo y otros cuentos. Buenos Aires: De la Flor, 1987. GARCÍA MÁRQUEZ, Gabriel. Isabel viendo llover en Macondo. Buenos Aires: Editorial Estuario, 1967. ONETTI, Juan Carlos. “Jacob y el otro”, in Tres novelas. Montevideo: Alfa, 1967. RULFO, Juan. “Nos han dado la tierra”, in El llano en llamas. Mexico: Fondo de Cultura Económica, 1953. VARGAS LLOSA, Mario. “Los cachorros”, in Los Jefes / Los cachorros. Madrid: Barral, 1980 (1967).

Unit 2: Politics and Fiction Fiction about the origin of the fatherland and related metaphors: foundation of the State, official history and other stories. Civilization and barbarism. The description of violence. The voice of the other: Peronism and representation. Literature and arms in the seventies. The young generation at the end of the century and democracy. Latin American exiles.

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Readings • • • • • • •

BOLAÑO, Roberto. “Ramírez Hoffman, el infame”, in La literatura nazi en América. Barcelona: Seix Barral, 1996. BORGES, Jorge Luis. “El simulacro”, in El Hacedor. Buenos Aires: Emecé, 1960. CORTÁZAR, Julio. “La banda”, in Final de juego. Buenos Aires: Sudamericana, 1956. REJTMAN, Martín. “Algunas cosas importantes para mi generación”, in Rapado. Buenos Aires: Planeta, 1992. REY ROSA, Rodrigo. “Negocio para el milenio”, in Ningún lugar sagrado. Barcelona: Seix Barral, 1998. ROZENMACHER, Germán: “Cabecita negra”, in Cabecita negra. Buenos Aires: De la Flor, 1997 (1962). WALSH, Rodolfo. “Esa mujer”, in Los oficios terrestres. Buenos Aires: Jorge Álvarez, 1965.

Course Methodology: Classes will comprise two pedagogic instances: During the first part of the class, the professor will make a presentation of the subject, with a first approach to each text, considering the author’s production and the socio-cultural context. During the second part of the class, work groups will be formed (with 3 or 4 students in each group) to discuss texts according to the instructions received. At the end of the class, the groups will share the results they have obtained. In order to facilitate access to the reading material, the texts will be compiled in a booklet including reading guides prepared by the course professors. Evaluation: • • •

Attendance, punctuality and active participation in class (30%); Written exam (30%). Essay on two texts worked on in class. Length: 4 pages, double spaced; Final written paper (40%). Comparative analysis of two of the texts included in the syllabus, at the student’s choice, addressing any of the topics discussed during the course. Length: 5 pages, double spaced.

Bibliography: ALTAMIRANO, Carlos and SARLO, Beatriz. Ensayos argentinos: de Sarmiento a la vanguardia. Buenos Aires: Ariel, 1997. BALDERSTON, Daniel. Borges: realidades y simulacros. Buenos Aires: Biblos, 2000. BARRENECHEA, Ana María. La expresión de la irrealidad en la obra de Borges. Buenos Aires: CEAL, 1984. CORTÁZAR, Julio. “Del cuento breve y sus alrededores”, in Último round. Mexico: Siglo XXI, 1974. CORTÉS ROCCA, Paola and KOHAN, Martín. Imágenes de vida, relatos de muerte. Eva Perón: cuerpo y política. Rosario: Beatriz Viterbo, 1998. FUENTES, Carlos. “Rulfo, el tiempo y el mito”, in J. Rulfo, Toda la obra. Mexico: Archivos, 1992. GAMERRO, Carlos. El nacimiento de la literatura argentina. Buenos Aires: Norma, 2006. Institute for Study Abroad® • 1100 W. 42nd St., Suite 305 • Indianapolis, IN 46208 • 800-858-0229 • Fax: 317-940-9704 • www.ifsa-butler.org

GILMAN, Claudia. Entre la pluma y el fusil. Debates y dilemas del escritor revolucionario en América Latina. Buenos Aires: Siglo XXI, 2003. KITRIK, Noé. “Forma y significación en El matadero de Esteban Echeverría”, in Suspender toda certeza. Antología crítica (1959-1976). Buenos Aires: Biblos, 1997. KRANIAUSKAS, John. “Rodolfo Walsh y Eva Perón”, in Nuevo Texto Crítico, Year VI, number 12/13, July 1993- June 1994. LINK, Daniel. “Rodolfo Walsh y la crisis de la literatura”, in Cómo se lee y otras intervenciones críticas. Buenos Aires: Norma, 2003. –––––––––––. Leyenda. Literatura argentina: cuatro cortes. Buenos Aires: Entropía, 2006. LUDMER, Josefina. Cien años de soledad. Una interpretación. Buenos Aires: Tiempo contemporáneo, 1972. MANZONI, Celina (editor). La fugitiva contemporaneidad. Narrativa latinoamericana 1990-2000. Buenos Aires: Corregidor, 2003. MOLLOY, Sylvia. Las letras de Borges y otros ensayos. Rosario: Beatriz Viterbo, 1999. MONSIVÁIS, Carlos. “Sí, tampoco los muertos retoñan, desgraciadamente”, in Juan Rulfo (comp.), Para cuando yo me ausente. México: Grijalbo, 1983. NAVARRO, Marysa (comp.). Evita. Mitos y representaciones. Buenos Aires: FCE, 2002. PANESI, Jorge. “Borges nacionalista”, in Críticas. Buenos Aires: Norma, 2000. PELLER, Diego. “Walsh con Masotta”, in Otra Parte, number 12, Spring 2007. PIGLIA, Ricardo. Crítica y ficción. Buenos Aires: Seix Barral, 2000. PRIETO, Martín. Breve historia de la literatura argentina. Buenos Aires: Aguilar, 2006. RAMA, Ángel. “Los procesos de transculturación en la narrativa latinoamericana” [1974], in La novela en América Latina. Panoramas 1920-1980. México: Universidad Veracruzana, Fundación Ángel Rama, 1986. ROSA, Nicolás. “Cortázar: los modos de la ficción” and “Cortázar o el engendramiento del lector”, in La letra argentina. Crítica 1970-2002. Buenos Aires: Santiago Arcos, 2003. RUFINELLI, Jorge. “Juan Rulfo”, prologue in Juan Rulfo, Obra completa. Caracas: Biblioteca Ayacucho, 1977. SARLO, Beatriz. Borges, un escritor en las orillas. Buenos Aires: Ariel, 1995. –––––––––––––. Escritos sobre literatura argentina. Buenos Aires: Siglo XX, 2007. –––––––––––––. La pasión y la excepción. Buenos Aires: Siglo XXI, 2003. SHUMWAY, Nicolás. La invención de la Argentina. Historia de una idea. Buenos Aires: Emecé 1993. VIÑAS, David. Literatura argentina y realidad política. Buenos Aires: CEAL, 1983.

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